Mr. Berger argues that if we want our product or idea to catch on and spread like wildfire, we must try to build into it as many of these six STEPPS as we can. (This may explain why some of my FB friends feel the need to fill the news feed with dozens of pictures & links on any given day). I am a student of the University of Baltimore and I am writing a review for this book for an assignment. Whether through a post on Facebook or Twitter, or telling an engaging story at a dinner party – people “self-share” experiences, ideas, and topics to make themselves and their lives appear more fascinating and interesting to others. . *A full executive summary of this book is available here: This book is useful for presenting a framework for how to think about making an idea, product or service contagious. Jonah Berger is a marketing professor at University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School and bestselling author of Contagious: Why Things Catch On (Simon & Schuster, 2013). Berger explains that “regardless of how plain or boring a product or idea may seem, there are ways to make it contagious…” if you know the right way to do it. Standing out in today’s market is harder than ever as advertising clutter projects 4,000 – 10,000 ads and brands at American consumers every day. First, I want to disclose that I received this book for free. Not really. The content was good, but I would have loved more depth on how to apply the author’s ideas and research. Berger provides the example, of looking for a restaurant in an unfamiliar city: we look for restaurants that are full of people (because it must be delicious or hip), and we walk by the restaurants that are empty (food too expensive or bland). the color red is linked with roses, Coca-Cola, cars, Valentine’s Day etc. Quick Book Review: Contagious - Why Things Catch On Ron Henry. Contagious: Why Things Catch On presents current research insights on creating word of mouth in an easy to comprehend but only introductory way. I was hoping for more of a book to understand "why" people fall for the gimmicks, want status symbols, and buy what they buy. Berger describes this form of word-of-mouth tool as “social currency,” or the “currency” we use to buy and sell people’s opinions of us. Ru La La is a member-only (originally invite only, now they allow for anyone to sign up) online flash sale clothing website providing daily deals on high fashion at discounted prices to those who are on their distribution list (aka the insiders). Welcome back. People do what they can see – “monkey see, monkey do”. Like ho. By making our products more public, we create self-promoting ideas that produce lasting memories that stick around well after the first interaction. In a few years it will seem fiercely dated, but at least the advertising principles won't stop working, whatever the medium. It makes a great pair with a few more books on marketing and influencing such as “ Make to Stick “, “ The Tipping Point “, “ Triggers “, “ Brandwashed ” and “ Influence “, the big classic by Cialdini. The video had absolutely nothing to do with the casino--it was just a catchy video! Book review by Matthew Hellman, Head of strategy for GE Digital, the Americas, and Asia Pacific and Catherine Trevor-Roberts, Consultant, Resultek. 301 certified writers online. Great marketing book and a good way to see why some of the dollars you spend are not working. The story was only a few minutes long – but it told a positive story, while simultaneously plugging the Dove brand. . This is a breakdown of the book Contagious : Things Catch On by Jonah Berger. Loading... Unsubscribe from Ron Henry? JetBlue (low cost airline) offers first class amenities to all passengers: quality snacks, comfortable / roomy seat, DIRECTV for all. Dhanteras 2020 : Watch the special live report from jewelry markets in I have never been so intrigued by Berger's principles and writing style. I loved every chapter. Contagious Why Things Catch On Download grГЎtis. It was like a mirror of Nir Eyal's book "Hooked" BUT if you look at the publish dates, this book was published first. (By the way, the author Jonah Berger was mentored by Chip Heath, the author of Made to Stick), This book about marketing and how it works on people. It helps merchants increase the likelihood that people buy your product and share with others. Sharing is all about minting social currency. Thank you, Dr. Berger, for this elucidating and very useful book. I don't get trends/fads or why so many people buy the things they do. Contagious: Why Things Catch On - Ebook written by Jonah Berger. This was an entertaining read and it was the perfect book for my day. When our emotions are tugged at in just the right way, we buy, talk, shop, share, spread, and express interest. ‘“Leverage game mechanics” – use elements of a game to make something fun, interesting, and hook the consumer. Need another excuse to go to the bookstore this week? Interestingly, only 7% of word-of-mouth content is shared online (Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram are merely tools to help support the spread of good ideas, not the answer to adoption), and while social media can help us reach millions of people, often face-to-face interactions are more effective and allow people to focus on the topic at hand (instead of sorting through the hordes of data online). You'd think a book that explores the mechanics of going viral would be, well, interesting -- that it would embody the concept it was exploring. Like how Trump did it. logos on shirts, the message at the end of an email sent on iPhone: “Sent from my iPhone” etc.). coffee vs. hot chocolate – people see and think about coffee every day, whereas hot chocolate is more seasonal, so associating with coffee is far more effective) and strength of the link (more unusual links are better than those that are associated with too many things, i.e. I kept it around a few weeks and looked at it and always thought, "What a great cover!" Contagious Why Things Catch On.pdf Free Download. A quick read, but I really enjoyed it. “Making the private public” suggests that if you can bring something to the surface that others previously had been too embarrassed to talk about – you can eliminate stigma around products, services, and ideas that were previously consumed privately and help it catch on with people who had previously felt uncomfortable discussing this out loud (i.e. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Contagious: Why Things Catch On. Companies and individuals can use this to their advantage, by providing their customers with products, experiences, and content that connect directly with them in a way that encourages sharing with others, while promoting the company’s ideas, causes and/or products simultaneously. Buy Contagious: Why Things Catch on by Berger, Jonah (ISBN: 9781451686579) from Amazon's Book Store. “Find inner remarkability” – generate something unique, quirky, surprising, or novel. Let me just tell you, I read this whole book in a 4 1/2 hour flight! They would be wrong. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. But, how can you make that happen for your business? Although I can predict trends and see market value; I was very curious about. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. When there is is a product, services, cause or article that provides practical applicability for someone you know, you will likely share with them. The book is good enough for what it is. - Read book Contagious Why Things Catch On PDF by mailtrix - Issuu Contagious Book Summary & Review in PDF The Power Moves - Jonah Berger is a marketing professor at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and author of the New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller Contagious: Why Things Catch On. Also there are many day to day activities such as knowledge , laughter , passion and so forth are already contagious in our life. Effective triggers are caused by frequency (how often we interact with a trigger i.e. – too many weak links, whereas when you hear the word “peanut butter”, “jelly” usually is the first link we think about). Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users. by Simon Schuster. Jonah Berger’s “Contagious: Why Things Catch On” – Book Review, Notes + Analysis. Now I didn't read this thinking I would walk away with earth shattering information, so I can understand why some may have been disappointed with this book. Leveraging good stories that are useful, engaging, and that drive value will help you and your product, idea, cause increase social influence and word-of-mouth transmission and propel it to be the next big thing. . It's an extremely lightweight read. I noticed that a number of reviewers received free copies -- I assume the publisher was attempting to generate some buzz. I received Contagious via BzzAgent. Berger calls the concept of looking at what others are doing to resolve our own uncertainty, “social proof.” Individuals imitate actions, because other’s choices provide information that helps them decide how to do something. The only positive thing that I can say about this book is that it's a fast read. Next in this ‘Contagious: Why Things Catch On’ review, Jonah analyses the New York Times most-emailed list to discover why emotions can dramatically increase our need to share. CEO’s, marketers, politicians, sociologists, and entrepreneurs alike, expend excessive time and resources to explore new ways to fuel buzz around their latest products, service, advertisements, campaigns or causes – yet without clear structure, it’s easy to spend millions of marketing dollars on methods that miss the mark every time. But the most effective and prosperous ideas have been empowered and supported by one or more of the 6 STEPPS in some way. STEPPS stands for: Sporting a business degree (advertising/PR/Marketing) under my belt means that I view the world, consumer and otherwise, in a marketing sense. Of course not all advertising works and there are examples of some of those. It was very easy to understand and also to apply what he was saying to my own life. I had been looking forward to this book release as the topic is interesting and even possesses its own themed six characteristics, conveniently ascribed the acronym STEPPS, which the author Jonah Berger explains contributes to why products or ideas become contagious. Contagious – Why Things Catch On by Jonah Berger (Professor of Marketing at The Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania) distills years of research into understanding why certain ads, products, YouTube videos, political movements, songs, and/or restaurants catch on, while others are ignored. This book about marketing and how it works on people. The book is a valuable blueprint for creating ideas, marketing campaigns, and strong messages that catch … I picked this book up in my local library, only intending to flick through a few pages. He offered some stories about brands that one could easily identify with. The best part of our knowledge ( which is contagious in nature ) is to “pass it on” ( share with others ) as said in a movie named “Lucy” and i could recall the dialogue at this moment :), This was an entertaining read and it was the perfect book for my day. What makes things popular? To get consumers thinking about the brand again she looked at when people ate Kit Kats the most… during breaks and usually with a hot beverage. Readers might suppose that Jonah Berger’s new book, “Contagious: Why Things Catch On,” would shed light on these famous cases of viral content. A very useful book for anyone wishing to have an impact with ideas. Maybe that's why they're popular. Jonah Berger. His book is for the world of the materialistic and I am not one of them. I highly recommend reading it so you can get the in-depth stories and studies he tells to back up his points. “If something is built to show, it’s built to grow.”- Jonah Berger Of the six wonderful principles (STEPPS) explained i believe that word of mouth is most effective. What creates viral content, and how can you do this for your own business? Everyday interactions we have with other people in life are definitely contagious in some way or the other. His new book is … Review Posted Online: Nov. 4, 2012. It turned out that during that same period, NASA was organizing a mission to Mars to collect samples and data from the planet – and with the continuous news cycle featuring NASAs and the planet Mars (the candy/company is named after the founder, not the planet), the news triggered the idea of the candy in people’s minds, and sure enough sales spiked. Or, reusable bags from Lululemon, event participation t-shirts, and Livestrong yellow wrist-bands provide the public a glimpse of what the individual believes or likes. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Contagious: Why Things Catch On at Amazon.com. The human brain is hot-wired to use this so-called “currency” to make a good impression on others. It is also possible to create a trigger by expanding the “habitat” that people exist in – meaning creating new habits / further associating your product or idea with things we do on a daily basis. Contagious Book Review “Contagious” is easy to read, insightful and highly applicable. The examples he used were very current and straight forward. Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of, Published Contagious: Why Things Catch On September 17, 2019 April 1, 2020 by Scott J. Pearson. A few years ago, Dove skin products created a viral video that showed how unrealistic professional models look in advertisements – showing how much make-up, hairspray, and photoshopping went into creating a “beautiful” advertisement. He sounded personable without coming across as overbearing or super geeky. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. I found this dull and not terribly informative. Others were more forgotten. “We’re not going to tell a friend who doesn’t have kids about the best way to change a diaper. But for me, it was stars. Refresh and try again. But for me, it. Jonah Berger has given us a very good read that builds on "Switch" and "The Tipping Point." There is just not that much information in this book far beyond common sense most people already intuitively know. But this would have been much more enjoyable if the author didn't repeat every single point twenty times. Cancel Unsubscribe. When it comes to pricing, “diminishing sensitivity” can influence buyer behavior, which is where the “Rule of 100” becomes handy. The basic STEPPS framework is as follows: Interesting and disturbing. 4. Understanding arousal can help you drive viral content and products for yourself, by focusing less on information (features and benefits) around your product or idea, and focus on how people think, feel, and react to certain messages. Jonah Berger’s book, ‘Contagious: Why Things Catch On‘ breaks down the ingredients that makes stuff spread. When people think about your product, they will likely talk about it, share their experience with it, and become repeat customers over time. If you find a great bargain, you will probably describe your entire experience when you recommend the deal to your friends. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. In fact, “word-of-mouth,” he explains, is effective because it is more persuasive (people trust what others tell them much more than they trust ads they see on T.V.) For example, when buying a book from Amazon, the website posts the original price next to the discounted price to make people think that they are getting a good deal – Amazon benefits from that contrast. Word of mouth. For example, there is a description of a youtube video that went viral, that advertised a blender--and boosted sales enormously. The spots did exactly as she hoped, and soon sales increased by 8% by the end of the year. He sounded personable without coming across as overbearing or super geeky. For example, in 2007, Colleen Chorak was the Hershey brand manager tasked with revitalizing the Kit Kat brand. Each chapter better than the next. This website uses cookies to improve your experience. “Contagious, Why Things Catch On” by Jonah Berger, published by Simon and Schuster. Contagious Why Things Catch On di Jonah Berger ecco la copertina e la descrizione del libro libri.cx ГЁ un motore di ricerca gratuito di ebook (epub, mobi, pdf), Contagious Why Things Catch On Baixe e leia livros gratuitamente. We will write a custom Book Review on “Contagious: Why Things Catch On” by Jonah Berger specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page. His book is for the world of the materialistic and I am not one of them. Observability plays a huge role in what products or ideas catch on. Of course not all advertising works and there are examples of some of those. Tax hikes, price increases, new iPhone releases, elections and policy stances – all evoke positive and negative outbursts that drive people to talk about it with those around them. New words have even been coined to describe the phenomenon … trending or viral. To create our list, we... To see what your friends thought of this book, I read some in "Thinking Fast and Slow" And some conclusions i got out of is that people are just more likely to go with what they're used to. As a playbook for marketers, Contagious is a success.” -- Danielle Sacks ― Fast Company “Contagious contains arresting — and counterintuitive — facts and insights. . SO, this was actually the original book. Contagious Why Things Catch On. While the contents of the book are nothing truly radical (after all marketing, in some form or the other, has existed for millennia), it is helpful to break down some of the art into easy-to-follow guidelines. Think about ways to make your product or idea stand out by breaking from tradition and what people expect from an experience; i.e. It's interesting to take the 6 factors discussed and review them against your corporate advertising. Poor Ash’s Almanack > Book Reviews > Business. And, totally unrelated, why do I occaisionally crave a Kit Kat bar? Berger provides the following example to illustrate this rule: Say you see someone you know and respect using an Apple Computer at a cafe (identified by the Apple logo and exterior casing), this form of public visibility might mean that you are likely to want to imitate their behavior and buy a Mac because it looks cool or because you want to emulate their behavior. “Making things more observable, makes them easier to imitate, which makes them more likely to become popular,” writes Berger. They had not changed their marketing campaigns, yet sales were up. Provides a plausible rationale for why people think the way they do. “[Berger] sheds new light on phenomena that may seem familiar, showing with precision why things catch on. In fact, more frequently trigger-associated products can increase word-of-mouth by 15 percent, and because it is top of mind, it generally means someone will be more likely to act on what they are thinking about. Learn More. Contagious: Why Things Catch On presents current research insights on creating word of mouth in an easy to comprehend but only introductory way. She began releasing ads that tied Kit Kats to coffee breaks at work, specifically eating them while drinking coffee. [sibwp_form id=1] In, I received Contagious via BzzAgent. Practical value is all about sharing useful information that will help others save time, energy and resources. Also there are many day to day activities such as knowledge , laughter , passion and so forth are already contagious in our life. It was an approachable read on how ideas take off and become contagious. “Make people feel like insiders” – scarcity and exclusivity drives desirability… people love when they feel like “insiders” i.e. The key to being successful for companies is to position this useful information in a way that stands out to consumers. Anyone involved in business has observed that certain products, services or ideas seem to catch on and become wildly popular.Others ideas fall flat.Why do some ideas fail to achieve widespread acceptance despite being high quality, of good value, and endowed with hefty advertising budgets? I finally started reading it on my trip to this past week. It contains many good anecdotes about promotions that worked and didn't work. In many cases, it can drive activism in politics, switching from one product to another, or writing a Yelp review online to encourage people to eat or not eat at a certain cafe. People binge drink in college, because they see their peers doing the same. Publisher: Simon & Schuster. In some ways, it reminded me of "Made to Stick" and the Tipping Point, but it did have it's own messaging. Then there is a video that went viral, and advertised a casino--but didn't boost sales at all. Maybe all popular non-fiction books are like that. © 2016-19 The Marketing Journal and the individual author(s). For example, in 1997, The Mars Candy Company noticed a spike in their Mars candy bar sales. I have never been so intrigued by Berger's principles and writing style. Have you ever wondered what makes a product successful? “Triggers” are stimuli that connect thoughts and ideas together. Most people miss superfluous details, so to get customers to think about your product or idea, weave it into a story with key factors critical to your brand and add other “sticky” factors: humor, creativity, quirky. There is just not that much information in this book far beyond common sense most people already intuitively know. In essence we are introduced to a means to put into practice what were simply observations in the Heath's and Gladwell's separate takes on how to influence others. Excellent and Informative Book with many examples to explain the concept of “Contagious” and how many things become viral and are spreaded. To do so, it’s important to create one of the following three things: The key to being successful across all of these factors, is to build intrinsic motivation within people – if something is truly successful, people will want to talk about or buy into your product or service if it means they will gain value from the product or experience, as well as look good to others. That’s why parents often send useful articles, coupons, as well as cooking & cleaning advice to their kids – it strengthens social bonds, even when distance makes things difficult. Contagious why things catch on free pdf, Ebook Contagious: Why Things Catch On currently available for review only, if you In this book, Berger reveals the secret science behind word-of-mouth and. It felt like I was attending a class. Word of mouth tends to reach people who are actually interested in the thing being discussed.” Study why people talk, what they talk about, and why some things are talked about more than others. I was hoping for more of a book to understand "why" people fall for the gimmicks, want status symbols, and buy what they buy. By designing products and ideas that are linked to our surroundings, it helps to set off frequent “lightbulbs” or “triggers” in people’s mind. Why not? Jonah Berger is a marketing professor at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and internationally bestselling author of Contagious, Invisible Influence, and The Catalyst.He’s a world-renowned expert on social influence, word of mouth, and why products, ideas, and behaviors catch on and has published over 50 papers in top-tier academic journals. Some products, ideas, services, and behaviors catch on and become popular while others falter. “Good game mechanics keep people engaged, motivated, and always wanting more.” i.e. Now I didn't read this thinking I would walk away with earth shattering information, so I can understand why some may have been disappointed with this book. Berger explains that certain emotions evoke action while causing others to stifle: Awe, excitement, humor evoke as much arousal as anger and anxiety, while contentment and sadness leave people to do nothing at all. I had been looking forward to this book release as the topic is interesting and even possesses its own themed six characteristics, conveniently ascribed the acronym STEPPS, which the author Jonah Berger explains contributes to why products or ideas become conta. It was an interesting book, if only because it solidified the fact that I would never want to work within any profession where this book is applicable. This was an alright book. WHY THINGS CATCH ON ... [and] can [be used to] make any product or idea contagious.” 0; Pub Date: March 5, 2013. The candy bar’s jingle had been around for 21 years, and had run its course. According to Jonah Berger in “Contagious: Why Things Catch On,’’ there are six ingredients associated with messages, products, or ideas that go viral. But while people focus on the story itself, information comes along for the ride.”, Goodreads Choice Award Nominee for Nonfiction (2013). Dove asked customers to send in videos of their own stories under the rubric of “Real Beauty.” Thousands of video stories were sent in, which generated millions of views. If this material is enough to cover an entire Wharton MBA course, then I'm not sure what that says about Wharton's program. Page Count: 224. I don't get trends/fads or why so many people buy the things they do. To November 2nd Winners: Anyone got copy of book. I read some in "Thinking Fast and Slow" And some conclusions i got out of is that people are just more likely to go with what they're used to. Consistent throughout all viral content, are six key ingredients or “STEPPS:” Social Currency; Triggers; Emotion; Public; Practical Value; Stories – none of which are mutually exclusive but are all independently available for use on your product or idea wherever and whenever it makes the most sense. This is a fun book, full of ideas for advertising new ideas or products. Companies understand that this is how their customers make purchasing decisions, and use it to their advantage to encourage customers to make selections easier and faster for them. But are those two things enough to explain why people would be willing to pay $100 for a cheese steak sandwich, why a certain video gets millions of hits on YouTube or one brand of blender outsells another? “People don't think in terms of information. . The video encourages the viewer to be natural and to be happy in one’s own skin. I think that is testament alone to author Jonah Berger knowing what he’s talking about in regards to making something viral or “contagious”. There are some products and services that seem to spread like wildfire? It's not particularly well written, nor is it (despite its claims) in the least scientific, but this book offers lots of cute stories and plenty of click-bait YouTube fodder. I did not know most of the references that the author mentioned. Contagious is one of those books that is destined to become essential business reading, especially for the marketer. Thus, it is important to think about context of the environment of the people you are trying to target: whether seasonal (candy corn and Halloween); geographic (cheesesteaks and Philadelphia). The author did his own narration for the audio and he did a great job. Those of us who work across sectors in community are always trying to find the magic formula for engaging and moving our respective audiences to action. It was very easy to understand and also to apply what he was saying to my own life. hotel and airline rewards programs… people will go out of their way to achieve status and to fly with their preferred airline (even if it means making multiple layovers), moreover they love telling others that they are a Diamond Medallion member with Delta and what their experience is as a Medallion member. What we talk about, inevitably determines what others perceive of us, which leads us to share things that make us seem more entertaining, clever, smart, and/or funny. Great overview of viral marketing, good stories, credible research, engaging style. The general rule: Stories are the most effective way to share ideas and information. “Contagious: Why Things Catch On” By Jonah Bergen is an eye-opening book full of not only entertaining examples of viral campaigns, but also a painstaking analysis into the science of social transmission. How does marketing work in an era where things go viral on the Internet and social media dominates our national discourse? Organic reasons why things catch on. I did not know most of the references that the author mentioned. Register for FREE updates Traditional marketing suggests that quality, price, and advertising are the critical factors to determine a product or idea’s ability to achieve success or popularity, but Berger argues that this misses the full view – social influence and word-of-mouth transmission are far more essential to drive “virality,” and ultimately account for 20-50% of all purchasing decisions. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. Jonah Berger proposes six principles that can be used in making a message more contagious. Contagious: Why Things Catch On by Jonah Berger Simon & Schuster, 256pp, £12.99 Readers might suppose that Jonah Berger’s new book would shed light on these famous cases of viral content. Jonah Berger Key Insights. Two key components to making something public: People like helping and feeling useful to others. Berger attempts to explore these mechanisms closer. Contagious: Why Things Catch On By. We’d love your help. . The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference. Everyone hear of him all the time, so even if he was good or bad, people voted for him. If the product sells for less than $100, sale price should be set in terms of the percentage reduction (discounts as a percentage seems more impressive on low priced items), If it’s greater than $100, discount the price in dollar reduction (discounts as a dollar seem more impressive on high cost items). Emotional content evokes feelings, both positive and negative, that drive people to share and act on those emotions. In this day and age so many people believe that advertising and/or social media drive trends. Contagious: Why Things Catch On Publisher: Simon & Schuster Author: Jonah Berger Price: $26.00 Format: Hardcover Length: 256 pages ISBN-13: 978 … There was one thing, however. online dating, supporting certain causes like Mustache November… where participants raise money growing a beard during there month of November… these things start a conversation). They think in terms of narratives. Jonah Berger is a marketing professor at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and bestselling author of Contagious: Why Things Catch On and Invisible Influence: The Hidden Forces that Shape Behavior. Analytics showed that the sales response functions of all promotional activities were enhanced by this program. For example, “I voted” stickers after voting make the private act less private and reminds others to vote too. Some 50 pages later, I realised I couldn’t put the book down! Does your company have any ideas that fit those factors that would make them great items to share and if not, how can you start too. The best part of our kn, Excellent and Informative Book with many examples to explain the concept of “Contagious” and how many things become viral and are spreaded. If this material is enough to cover an entire Wharton MBA course, then I'm not sure what that says about Wharton's program. The examples he used were very current and straight forward. I wanted to get inside their heads. and more targeted (people share stories with those who are actually interested in the topic). While social currency gets people to talk about things, “triggers” keep ideas and products fresh in the minds of consumers, ensuring that they keep talking about your idea. Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 3.7K. Everyday interactions we have with other people in life are definitely contagious in some way or the other. Does someone share a link on FB for social credit, or are they moved by something to the point they feel they must share it? Self-advertising, or product or idea that transmits social proof or passive approval because usage is observed (i.e. The author did his own narration for the audio and he did a great job. Practical value relies heavily on buyer behavior, and Berger explains that people use “reference points” to determine the value of a good, service, or discount. He offered some stories about brands that one could easily identify with. Let me just tell you, I read this whole book in a 4 1/2 hour flight! Contagious: Why Things Catch On by Jonah Berger explored these ideas. Contagious is sorted into a six “STEPPS” process: Social currency, Triggers, Emotion, Public, Practical value, and Stories. I loved every chapter. no spam! Each ch. Humans think in terms of narratives, which is why we frequently recall and share stories. Contagious – Why Things Catch On Author: Jonah Berger Publisher: Simon and Schuster Publication: 2013 Ever since Gladwell’s Tipping Point, the business press has been adding flesh to the bare bones theory that what make’s a product or idea ‘go viral’ is 1) The Law of the Few (seed with influencers), 2) The Stickiness Factor (play to […] Consistent throughout all viral content, are six key ingredients or “STEPPS:” Social Currency; Triggers; Emotion; Public; Practical Value; Stories – none of which are mutually exclusive but are all independently available for use on your product or idea wherever and whenever it makes the most sense. This book is perfect for anyone getting into marketing for this first time, and wants a 101 on Content and 'Viral' marketing. All Rights Reserved. I finally started reading it on my trip to this past week. As Berger explains, “Information travels under the guise of what seems like idle chatter… we need to… (embed) our products and ideas in stories that people want to tell… [by making] our message so integral to the narrative that people can’t tell the story without it.”. March 5th 2013 Behavioral residue, or remnants that a product, idea or story leave behind after use or purchase. Contagious: Why Things Catch On So I won this in a goodreads give away. Jonah Berger is a marketing professor at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and internationally bestselling author of Contagious, Invisible Influence, and The Catalyst.He's a world-renowned expert on social influence, word of mouth, and why products, ideas, and behaviors catch on and has published over 50 papers in top-tier academic journals. ISBN: 978-1-4516-8657-9. In his award-winning, New York Times best seller Contagious Why Things Catch On, author Jonah Berger gives countless real-life examples of the mysterious methods employed to capture the logic defying attention of the masses. I wanted to get inside their heads not hear how to sell it to them. I paid for my copy and wish I'd spent the money on something more, well, buzz-worthy. So, they make choices based on what they see. Dr. Berger has spent over 15 years studying how social influence works and how it drives products and ideas to catch … Everyone has a theory about why ideas go viral, but Jonah Berger has studied the phenomenon and it’s not all babies and cats. BOOK REVIEW: “Contagious: Why Things Catch On” by Jonah Berger, “Crowdsourcing, Innovation, and the Tyranny of Ideas” – An Interview with jovoto’s Bastian Unterberg, Tim Aßmann, and Liz von Loewen, “What’s Next for Marketing?” – An Interview with Sundar Bharadwaj, “When Logic meets Intuition: The Squircle” – an interview with Francis Cholle, “Ending the War Between Sales and Marketing” – An Interview with Philip Kotler and Neil Rackham, “Harnessing Your Personal Narrative” – An interview with John Hagel, “Consumer Boycotts: An Essential Method of Peaceful Protest” – Philip Kotler, “The Rise of 5 New-Normal Lifestyles” – Philip Kotler. Why do some things get more word of mouth than others, and how, by understanding that science, can we make our own stuff more successful? The anecdotes were helpful, but more would have helped. What do you think about it? But what if we could use research in a way that helps us understand how things go viral? Most of the examples provided are quite good, however, the book itself could have been more concise and organised. Basically one man's rules on how to swindle people through advertising because they make it so easy to do. We've got you covered with the buzziest new releases of the day. Public – “Built to show, built to grow” Berger explains that “regardless of how plain or boring a product or idea may seem, there are ways to make it contagious…” if you know the right way to do it. It's interesting to learn about different products or movements (or Youtube videos, I guess) that have gone viral. Start by marking “Contagious: Why Things Catch On” as Want to Read: Error rating book. If you get someone bought in, they will likely tell their friends and family about it, thus beginning the cycle of creating something viral. Moreover, products and ideas with practical value is passed along to help others despite geographic distances. Of the six wonderful principles (STEPPS) explained i believe that word of mouth is most effective. It felt like I was attending a class. I kept it around a few weeks and looked at it and always thought, "What a great cover!"

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